Have you visited Oscar-Zero yet?

North Dakota's newest historic site and attraction takes visitors back to the years of the Cold War with hundreds of nuclear missiles beneath the ground, ready for a presidential alert/code.  When the mission control stations and Minuteman Missiles were deactived in 1997, one site - north of Cooperstown, ND - was left completely intact.  Even the 1997 magazines (now considered artifacts) are still in their racks.

I visited Oscar-Zero, once a nuclear mission control, last month.  It was very cool being able to go 60-feet into the ground and experience the control center.  A couple of things really surprised me.  First, the size of the blast doors that would have protected the control center are enormous.  Secondly, the fact that the rooms were on huge, hydraulic springs in the case of a bombing.  And finally, the above-ground living quarters were pretty nice.  Here's a preview from my visit - then be sure to plan your own.  The site is open daily through September 15, and then will have fall hours from September 15-October 31.

The unassuming mission control located behind fences.

The unassuming mission control located behind fences.

Above-ground living room.

Above-ground living room.

Under-ground control room.

Under-ground control room.