The sun sets on another day of birding at Lake Audubon in central North Dakota.
The sun sets on another day of birding at Lake Audubon in central North Dakota.

The sounds of spring come from the trees

Birders have reason to get excited when spring returns

Longer days, warmer temperature, melting snow; all signal the arrival of spring. While they stir the visual senses, the true sounds of spring eminate from the trees and shrubs. With warmer weather come birds whose songs accompany the return of green grass and leaves.

Looking for your North Dakota birding checklist? A detailed list of 365 species is available online from the Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center. The North Dakota Birding Society also offers tips for finding specialities.

Wondering where to bird? North Dakota has more national wildlife refuges than any other state. That means birding access is free and easily found here. There are also specific birding lists available for many of the refuges. State parks, national park and game preserves are also great places for fulfilling those life lists. The North Dakota Parks and Recreation Department maintains a list of birding locations and you can also consider staying at a North Dakota campground.

Birders take to the field with their checklists and also celebrate birding at a number of summer birding festivals in North Dakota: Turtle Mountain Birding Festival, Birding Drives Dakota, Lostwood Birding Festival and Potholes and Prairie Birding Festival.

 

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